Mission Statement

In episode three of the BBC series Spaced, protagonist Tim (Simon Pegg) is asked by his best friend, “What are you playing?” 

Tim’s playing Resident Evil, in case you were curious. But Tim does not answer by providing the given Christian name of the software, oh no. Tim replies by telling his roommate what Resident Evil actually is:

“A subtle blend of lateral thinking and extreme violence.”

In recent years, it has become oh-so-fashionable, in what was once accurately labeled the enthusiast press, to suggest that games ought to strive for any number of supposedly higher callings. Indeed, it’s a minor miracle if a gamer can go an entire week without encountering a long-winded diatribe about how games ought to be more sensitive toward this group, more inclusive of that group, more accessible to that group over there, so on and so forth; fun and awesomeness be damned.

It has become fashionable to suggest games ought to strive for supposedly higher callings, fun and awesomeness be damned.

Dearest reader, if that’s what you’re chasing, you won’t find it here. I implore you to bring your cursor to the back button and pull, with haste. There are any number of websites, staffed top-to-bottom by insufferable hipsters locked in a perpetual cold war of faux-progressive posturing, that would be more than glad to indulge the misguided notion that your pet social causes ought to be priority items for products that ultimately exist to entertain and turn a profit. Leave this place of darkness, ye Internet Social Justice Warriors, ye anointed ones. Go with God.

Leave this place of darkness, ye Internet Social Justice Warriors, ye anointed ones. Go with God.

For those remaining, what you will find here is simple. You will find thoughtful writing about video games, by people who enjoy video games. This shouldn’t be such a novel selling point, but sadly, it is. We do not fancy ourselves critics, scholars, or academics. We do not label each instance of impotent outrage projected upon video games as a movement or conversation. We aren’t about that.

We do not label impotent outrage projected upon games as movements or conversations

For all the trendy handwringing about what a game can or should be, we view ourselves as keepers of a high, holy truth – and this is where our opening exposition comes full circle: The best video games are a subtle blend of lateral thinking and extreme violence, a mixture which very often results in a byproduct of exalted magnificence. With all due respect to the rare outliers, the rest are trash and fluff.

Welcome to thoughtful writing about video games, driven by one holy truth: The best video games are a subtle blend of lateral thinking and extreme violence.

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